methods@manchester: research methods in the social sciences

Qualitative-interviewing/analysis

Narrative research refers to any study that analyses narrative materials, which can range from ‘naturally occurring’ narratives to oral life stories collected for research purposes to written narratives found in the private, public or political realms. Find out more...

‘creative interviewing’ refers to a form of interview that is qualitative, flexible, loosely or semi-structured (non-standardised) and involves the construction of data and knowledge through processes that can be seen as ‘creative’ in some way. Find out more...

Ethnomethodology thinks of itself as an asymmetrical and incommensurable alternate to sociology more generally. Its methodological preoccupations can be articulated around the theme of unique adequacy, which arises from conceiving ‘sociological description’ as something which (a) is practiced by the participants in social affairs themselves and (b) is itself socially organised. Find out more...

A Focus Group is a structured and moderated discussion involving a group of around ten participants who are encouraged to share their views and experiences in relation to a specific issue or subject. Find out more...

In the UK Citizens’ Juries have involved members of the public, researchers and policy makers coming face to face to deliberate research, policy evidence and expert opinion over a three or four day period. Find out more...

In recent years, the internet has become an increasingly popular tool for researching social life. This talk draws on my experience of using e-mail interviews (or asynchronous computer-mediated communication (CMC)) to research popular music and the life course. Find out more...

 

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